Black Queer Visibility: Finding Simon | 17 July to 9 August 2019

The Simon Nkoli Collective is a partnership with the Dean’s Office – Faculty of Humanities, the Centre of Sexualities, AIDS and Gender (CSA&G), the Centre for Human Rights (CHR), and the Sociology Department. The Collective aim is to use this exhibition to open debates on transformation, social justice and ideas of memory 25 years into democracy.  Moreover, the exhibition is also a celebration of the Faculty of Humanities Centenary through which Simon Nkoli’s memory is evoked as a site for reflecting on Black queer resilience. The desire to inhabit the past through Simon’s journey is to  map this existence within the contradictions of (in)equality.

Why Simon: The aim is to provide an interesting and engaging introduction to the history of LGBTIQ activism rooted in Black narratives. In the excavation of the earlier narratives of black queer visibility it is difficult to overlook the much-documented life of Simon. It is undeniable that he championed many efforts. When Simon Nkoli’s  memory is revisited, three images are often portrayed: his anti-apartheid, HIV/AIDS, and LGBTI activism. Some argue that he was an internationalist. Nonetheless,  Nkoli remains one of the prominent internationally celebrated South African black queers.

The photographic exhibition profiles a series of thirty images, eleven awards, one video installations and a kanga designed by Kenyan visual artist Kawira Mwirichia. The nature of the installation requires minimal narration with the material intended to solicit the participatory presence of a spectator. Visitors will absorb, critically analyse and construct for themselves the Simon they prefer.

 

Dates: 17 July to 9 August 2019

Viewing times: 9:00 to 16:00

Venue: New Student Gallery, Javett Art Centre, UP Hatfield Campus

Queries: simonnkolicollective@gmail.com

 

somin nkoli

Why not me? Reflections on running sexual harassment workshops

Speaker: Pierre Brouard, CSA&G University of Pretoria
Date: 21 May 2019
Time: 14:30-16:00
Venue: Graduate Centre, Room 2-65, University of Pretoria, Hatfield Campus
RSVP: nombongo.shenxane@up.ac.za

This paper asks “Why not me”? When I am confronted with the daily indignities of (mostly) women, in the street, in the classroom, in the boardroom, and I have not examined my own behaviour as a man, should I ask “why not me”? When I see gender stereotypes and gender power plays in multiple contexts, and I don’t challenge them, should I ask “why not me”? When I think back on my experiences of harassment which I ignored, denied or felt too weary to challenge, because patriarchy is pervasive, should  I ask “why not me”? When I run a sexual harassment workshop as a man, and I am challenged about whether this is right, because men are complicit, can I ask “why not me”? Beyond “why not me”? the paper asks if sexual harassment work “works”, looks at the evidence and opens a debate on what an appropriate response to #MeToo could look like in 2019.

Pierre is the Deputy Director of the CSA&G and a registered Clinical Psychologist. He has worked in HIV since the mid 1980’s and at the CSA&G since 2001 as a manager, researcher, writer, facilitator and teacher. His interests include sexualities, gender, diversity, transformation and human rights.

IDAHOT panel discussion: Justice and Protection for All

Please join us for a panel discussion in celebration of the International Day Against Homophobia,Transphobia & Biphobia (IDAHOT). The theme for this year, Justice and Protection for All, reminds us that over the past decades, protection of LGBTQI+ people and all people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions or sex characteristics has greatly expanded and this progress is well worth celebrating, but we must guard against complacency. 72 countries still criminalise same-sex sexual relations and even in SA, LGBTQI+ people still face
regular stigma and discrimination.

Discussion: Laws vs. Hearts and Minds: how is justice and protection for queer people best served?

Panelists:

  • Geoffrey Ogwaro – Centre for Human Rights
  • Moude Maodi-Swartz – OUT LGBT Wellbeing
  • Rudo Chigudu – Centre for Human Rights, and
  • Clara van Niekerk – UP & Out

Moderators: Pierre Brouard and Christi Kruger (CSA&G)

Date: 16 May 2018
Time: 12:30 – 14:00
Venue: Graduate Centre Room 1.57, University of Pretoria, Hatfield Campus

 

IDAHOT

Worldwide LGBT organisations select “Alliances for Solidarity” as 2018 global theme

Every year the global community of sexual and gender minorities identifies one specific focus issue for the celebrations around May 17th.

This focus issue is of course only a suggestion and it is left for everyone to see how this is relevant for their strategiesThis year, the proposal is to focus attention on ALLIANCES for SOLIDARITYIndeed, no battle can be won in isolation.

We all need to keep strengthening alliances, especially when we need to ensure safety, fight violence, lobby for legal change, and/or campaign to change hearts and minds.

Putting the focus of the Day on Solidarity and Alliances can create a valuable opportunity for all of us to reach out to our current partners to reinforce our bond, to reach out to new partners to raise awareness of our commonalities, and to engage in collective action around the Day.This focus should also be a welcome reminder of the need for solidarity within the communities of sexual and gender minorities, as the rights of one specific group cannot be solidly secured if the rights of other groups are left unchallenged.

The focus on alliances should also highlight the necessity for sexual and gender minorities to be allies to other vulnerable groups (e.g. migrants, people living in poverty, vulnerable children, etc.).

For more information go to: https://dayagainsthomophobia.org/